Translation Part III: The Sadrists and the left, conclusion. Faris Kamal Nadhmi

This is the final par of my translation of an article by independent leftist Iraqi intellectual and social psychologist Faris Kamal Nadhmi (Part I, and Part II can be found by following the links). In this final concluding section, Nadhmi critiques the notion of the Sadrists as ‘blind’ followers of their religious leader. This question

Faris Kamal Nadhmi, Part II: ‘The Sadrist Trend: Between Nationalism and Islamism’

This post features the second part of my translation of an article by independent leftist Iraqi intellectual and social psychologist Faris Kamal Nadhmi. Part I can be read here. In this section, Nadhmi presents an interesting analysis of the Sadrist trend as a social movement which could be a potential vehicle for the development of

Montadhar Naser: Iraqi protesters express solidarity with journalist charged with defamation

Update: 23rd August 2016 Montadhar Naser was yesterday acquitted by an Iraqi court and charges against him of defamation were dropped. In a victory for press and freedom of expression campaigners, the judge in the case declared there was insufficient evidence to uphold the charges which many regarded as politically motivated after Naser published a

Quick update on the most recent Friday protest (12th August) in Baghdad.

The Sadrists’ 30 day hiatus from participation in the protests for reform continues (details of this can be found in an earlier post). One reason Muqtada al-Sadr gave for the 30 day withdrawal was to allow space for other groups to participate in the movement, and especially those in the civil-trend who have previously stayed

Long Read: Article for 1001 Iraqi Thoughts, profile of Ahmad Abd al-Hussein and civil trend-Sadrist cooperation

Analyses, in both Western and Arab discourses, of Iraq’s ongoing protests against corruption and ‘sectarian quotas’ tend to be inflected with an elite-sectarian framework. This framework foregrounds sect-based identities and their manipulation by elite actors and institutions in its explanations of these mobilisations. Consequently, political protest in Iraq is rarely seen as indicative of participatory,

What happened in Tahrir square on Friday (when the Sadrists stayed away)?

Last Saturday (July 30th, 2016) Muqtada al-Sadr released a statement in which he announced that the Sadrist trend would not participate, for a period of 30 days, in ongoing protests against corruption in Baghdad’s Tahrir square. In his statement Sadr said that: ‘There are those who do not attend the protests because of the presence

Post for 1001 Iraqi Thoughts: IRAQI ACTIVISTS FIGHTING BACK AGAINST LEGISLATION WHICH SEEKS TO RESTRICT CIVIL LIBERTIES

An expanded version of a recent post has been put up on 1001 Iraqi Thoughts. “Iraqi activists are currently fighting against a draft law, the ‘Law of Freedom of Expression, Gathering, and Peaceful Protest’, which contains a number of amendments which seek to severely restrict basic civil liberties. Activists from across the civil trend spectrum,